Retrospective Assessment of Low Birth Weight in Nigeria Using Life Table

Main Article Content

C. O. Okoro
U. C. Ikediuwa
F. U. Mgbudem
B. Osondu
B. Uwabunkonye

Abstract

This study focuses on low-birth-weight (LBW) in Nigeria. The main objective is to obtain the life table probability of a mother giving birth to a low-birth-weight child, which may be relevant in assessing the progress of Sustainable Development Goals in Nigeria. The descriptive statistics and method of life table analysis were applied to the dataset on birth weights from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys (NDHS), 1990 to 2013. The result shows that on average, there are approximately 13 LBWs per 1000 live births among mothers aged 25 to 29, which is the highest while the rates declined rapidly in the older ages. The prevalence rate of LBW obtained for the period is slightly below 8.0% (7.9). The incidence rate increased from 7.0% in 1990 NDHS to 10.2% in 2003 NDHS and declined to 7.3% in 2013 NDHS. The consequences of low-birth-weight among women of childbearing age are increasing neonatal and infant mortality rates, which may hinder the achievement of SDGs in Nigeria. We recommend that the government should encourage mothers to deliver their babies in the approved health care facilities to ensure weight measurement at birth.

Keywords:
Descriptive, mother, life table, low-birth-weight, survey

Article Details

How to Cite
Okoro, C. O., Ikediuwa, U. C., Mgbudem, F. U., Osondu, B., & Uwabunkonye, B. (2020). Retrospective Assessment of Low Birth Weight in Nigeria Using Life Table. Asian Journal of Pregnancy and Childbirth, 3(2), 46-54. Retrieved from https://journalajpcb.com/index.php/AJPCB/article/view/30114
Section
Original Research Article

References

World Health Organization. Care of preterm and low-birth-weight newborn; 2017.

[Retrieved on 22nd of August, 2019]

Available:http://www.who.int/gho/maternal_child_adolescent/newborns/prematurity/situation/en/

United Nations Children’s Fund and World Health Organization, Low Birthweight: Country, regional and global estimates. UNICEF, New York; 2004.

Kramer MS. Determinants of low birth weight: Methodological assessment and meta-analysis, Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1987;65(5):663–737.

Rashidul AM, Marufa S, Abdur RS. Distribution and determinants of low birth weight in developing countries. Journal of Preventive Medicine & Public Health. 2015;50:18-28.

Ademola MA, Adenike MD, Adebo MT, Motunrayo FO, Abraham OB, Precious EO, Omolayo OO, Oyewole OO. Trends of low birth weight in Ogun state, Nigeria, 1991-1999. Applied Science Research. 2011;3(2):89-96.

Amosu AM, Atulomah NOS, Olanrewaju MF, Akintunde TI, Babalola AO, Akinnuga AM, Ojezele MO. Retrospective study of some factors influencing delivery of low birth weight babies in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria. Scientific Research and Essays. 2011;6(2):236-240.

Yilgwan CS, Abok II, Yinnang WD, Vajime BA. Prevalence and risk factors of low birth. Weight in Jos; 2015.

[Retrieved on 22nd of August, 2019]

Available:http://www.google.com.ng/url?/sa=
t&source=web&rct=j&url=https:www.ajol.info/index.php/jjm/article/download/

Ndu IK, Edelu BO, Uwaezuoke SN, Chinawa JC, Ubesie A, Ogoke CC, Iloh KK, Ekwochi U. Maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight neonates: A multi-centre, cross-sectional study in a developing country. Journal of Neonatal Biology; 2015.

DOI: 10.4172/2167-0897.1000190

Ekwochi U, Ifediora C, Osuorah CDI, Ndu IK, Asinobi NI, Amadi OF, Agwu I, Okeke IB. Determinants of survival in low birth weight infants at a tertiary healthcare facility in the South Eastern Nigeria. Journal of Experimental Research. 2017; 5(1):42.

Maznah D, Nazar A, Oche MO, Norlaili AA. Risk factors for low birth weight in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. Global Health Action; 2016.

Available:http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v9.28822

World Health Organization. Nutrition Landscape Information System (NLIS) country profile indicators: Interpretation guide; 2010.

United Nations. Transforming our Wold: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; 2015.

[Retrieved on 22nd of August, 2019]

Available:https://sustainabledevelopment.org

Kpedekpo GMK. Working life table for males in Ghana, 1960. Journal of the American Statistical Association. 1969; 64(325):102-110.

Madugba I. The main features of the Female Labour Force in Nigeria, 1965. Journal of the Royal statistical society. Series A (General). 1976;139(2):258- 264.

Adewara AA, Kolawole OA, Job O. Estimation of abridge work-life expectancy in Kwara State Nigeria using Kpedekpo’s working life scheme. Nigeria Journal of Pure & Applied Sciences. 2016;29(2): 2897-2907.

National Population Commission, Federal Republic of Nigeria and ICF International, Maryland USA. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2013. Abuja/Rockville: National Population Commission and ICF International; 2014.

Ndubuisi U, Emma-Onyero CC, Suleiman U. Terrorism and Boko-Haram insurgency in North East Nigeria, Lapai Journal of Humanities. 2020;11(1):195–206.

Federal Office of Statistics, Federal Republic of Nigeria and ORC Macro. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 1990. Calverton, Maryland: National Population Commission and ORC Macro; 1992.

National Population Commission, Federal Republic of Nigeria and ORC Macro. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 1999. Calverton, Maryland: National Population Commission and ORC Macro; 2000.

National Population Commission, Federal Republic of Nigeria and ORC Macro. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2003. Calverton, Maryland: National Population Commission and ICF Macro; 2004.

National Population Commission, Federal Republic of Nigeria and ICF Macro. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008. Abuja, Nigeria: National Population Commission and ICF Macro; 2009.

World Health Organization. Care of the preterm and low-birth-weight newborn.

[Retrieved on 22nd of August, 2019]

Available:www.who.int/maternal_child

Ramakrishnan U. Nutrition and low birth weight: From research to practice. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;79:17-21.

Assefa N, Berhane Y, Worku A. Wealth status, mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) and antenatal care (ANC) are determinants for low birth weight in Kersa, Ethiopia. PLoS One. 2012;7:e39957.

Available:http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039957

Olu Dunant S. The birth weight of Nigerian babies. J Trop Pediatr. 2005;41:140-1.

Feresu SA, Harlow SD, Welch K, Gillespie BW. Incidence of and socio-demographic risk factors for stillbirth, preterm birth and low birth weight among Zimbabwean women. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2004; 18:154-63.

Hannah Blencowe, Julia Krasevec, Mercedes de Onis, Robert E. Black, Xiaoyi An, Gretchen A. Stevens, Elaine Borghi, Chika Hayashi, Diana Estevez, Luca Cegolon, Suhail Shiekh, Victoria Ponce Hardy, Joy E. Lawn, Simon Cousens. National, regional and worldwide estimates of low birth weight in 2015, with trends from 2000: A systematic analysis, Lancet Glob Health. 2019;7:e849–60.

Available:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30565-5

Zakariah Adam, Donne Kofi Ameme, Priscillia Nortey, Edwin Andrew Afari, Ernest Kenu. Determinants of low birth weight in neonates born in three hospitals in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana, 2016- an unmatched case-control study, BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth; 2019.

Available:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-019-2315-6